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Bruce Sutter Speaker Fees

Bruce Sutter Agent

Category:

Baseball, Hall of Famers

Title:

Hall Of Fame Pitcher, St. Louis Cardinals, Atlanta Braves & Chicago Cubs

Travels From:

Georgia

Fee Range:

$10,001 - $20,000

Contact For Bruce Sutter Booking Agent Info

Bruce Sutter Booking Agency Profile

Call PFP Sports Talent Agency at 1.800.966.1380 if you would like to contact a Bruce Sutter booking agent for a speaking engagement, personal appearance, product endorsement or corporate event. Retired baseball star, Bruce Sutter, was born on January 8, 1953 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Sutter is a former right-handed relief pitcher who was the first pitcher to make effective use of the split-finger fastball, which he called "The Jewel".

Bruce Sutter was one of the sport's dominant relievers in the late 1970s and early 1980s, where he became the only pitcher to lead the National League in saves five times (1979-1982, 1984), and retired with 300 saves – at the time, the third highest total in history, behind Rollie Fingers (341) and Rich "Goose" Gossage (302), and an NL record until broken by Lee Smith in 1993.

Sutter had set the NL record in 1982 with his 194th save, surpassing the mark held by Roy Face. In his first nine seasons, only Kent Tekulve made more appearances, and he saved 133 of the Chicago Cubs' 379 wins between 1976 and 1980. In 1979, Sutter won the NL's Cy Young Award as the league's top pitcher. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown in 2006.

Bruce Sutter was a member of three different teams during his career from 1976 to 1988. After being selected by the Washington Senators in the 21st round of the June 1970 draft, Sutter instead attended Old Dominion University, and later signed with the Cubs as a free agent in September 1971. He spent slightly over four seasons in the Cubs' farm system, and played on the 1975 Texas League (AA) champion Midland Cubs. It was in the Cubs' farm system that Sutter was taught the split-finger fastball by minor league pitching instructor Fred Martin. He joined the Chicago Cubs in May 1976, and after five seasons was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals for Leon Durham and Ken Reitz in December 1980, and then joined the Atlanta Braves in December 1984 as a free agent.

In 1979, Sutter saved 37 games for the Cubs, tying the NL record held by Clay Carroll (1972) and Rollie Fingers (1978). In addition to the Cy Young Award, Sutter also won both the Rolaids Relief Man of the Year Award and The Sporting News Fireman of the Year Award in 1979, 1981, 1982 and 1984. He was a member of the Cardinals team which won the 1982 World Series and is credited with two saves in that Series, including the Series-clinching save in Game 7 which ended with a strikeout of Gorman Thomas and a leaping hug by catcher World Series MVP Darrell Porter; Sutter also earned the save in the pennant-clinching victory in the NLCS.

In 1984, Bruce Sutter tied Dan Quisenberry's major league record, set the previous year, for most saves in a season (45), a record broken by Dave Righetti (46) in 1986; Sutter's NL record was broken by Lee Smith (47) in 1991.

Sutter was named to the NL's All-Star team six times (1977-1981, 1984), appearing in the games of 1978 through 1981. He played a major role in all four contests, earning the win in 1978 and 1979, and saves in 1980 and 1981.

On September 8, 1977, Sutter struck out three batters on nine pitches — Ellis Valentine, Gary Carter and Larry Parrish — in the ninth inning of a 10-inning 3-2 win over the Montreal Expos. Sutter became the 12th National League pitcher and the 19th pitcher in Major League history to accomplish the nine-strike/three-strikeout half-inning. Sutter had also struck out the side (though not on nine pitches) upon entering the game in the eighth inning, giving him six consecutive strikeouts, tying the NL record for a reliever.

He was momentarily the highest paid player in baseball, although he agreed to have his Atlanta contract configured so that he was paid $750,000 for six years with the rest going into an insurance fund that was to be structured to pay him $1,000,000 for 30 years.

Upon retirement, Sutter stayed near Atlanta with his wife and three sons. He has had three shoulder surgeries, three knee surgeries, an elbow operation, and two back operations.

His son Chad was a catcher who played for Tulane University and was selected by the New York Yankees in the 23rd round (711st overall) of the 1999 amateur draft.

On January 10, 2006, Sutter was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his 13th year of eligibility by receiving 400 votes out of a possible 520, or 76.9%. He is the first pitcher who never started a game to be elected to the Hall, and with 1042 1/3 career innings pitched he is also the first inductee to end his career with fewer than 1700 innings. Sutter's Hall of Fame plaque depicts him wearing a Cardinals cap and his trademark beard.

Sutter's number 42, which he wore throughout his career, was retired by the St. Louis Cardinals during a ceremony at Busch Stadium on September 17, 2006. He shares his retired number with Jackie Robinson, whose number 42 had previously been retired by "all" Major League teams in 1997.

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DISCLAIMER: PFP Sports Talent Agency does not claim to represent itself as the exclusive agent for Bruce Sutter. PFP Sports Talent Agency is a booking agency that represents organizations seeking to hire pro athletes and sports personalities such as Bruce Sutter for speaking engagements, personal appearances, product endorsements and corporate entertainment. Fees on this website are estimates and are intended only as a guideline. Exact fees are determined by a number of factors, including the location of event, the talent’s schedule, requested duties and supply and demand. PFP Sports Talent Agency makes no guarantees to the accuracy of information found on this website and does not warrant that any information or representations contained on this website will be accurate or free from errors. We are often asked how can I find out who is Bruce Sutter's agent? To find Bruce Sutter appearance fees and booking agent details, you can contact the agent, representative or manager through PFP Sports Talent Agency for speaking fee costs and availability. PFP Sports Talent Agency can help your company choose the ideal sports personality for your next marketing campaign. To hire Bruce Sutter for an appearance, speaking event or endorsement, contact Bruce Sutter's booking agent for more information.