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Josh Hamilton Speaker Fees

Josh Hamilton Agent

Category:

Baseball

Title:

Outfielder, Texas Rangers

Travels From:

Texas

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Josh Hamilton Booking Agency Profile

Call PFP Sports Talent Agency at 1.800.966.1380 if you would like to contact a Josh Hamilton booking agent for a speaking engagement, personal appearance, product endorsement or corporate event. Josh Hamilton is a Major League Baseball All Star outfielder for the Texas Rangers.

Hamilton started to play baseball from the age of 8 to be like his older brother, growing up in North Carolina.

Hamilton was selected first overall by the Tampa Bay Devil Rays in the 1999 Major League Baseball Draft. Shortly after the draft, Hamilton signed with Tampa Bay, receiving a $4 million signing bonus, and joined their minor league system.

Prior to the 2001 season, Hamilton was involved in a car accident. His mother and father were also injured in the accident, but they recuperated from their injuries. The 2001 season also marked the beginning of his drug and alcohol use, and he made his first attempt at rehab. Hamilton only played 45 games in the 2001 season, split between Charleston (A-Ball) and the Orlando Rays (AA)
At the start of the 2003 season, Hamilton showed up late several times during spring training and was reassigned to the team's minor league camp. He left the team and resurfaced several times, but eventually took the rest of the season off for personal reasons. Hamilton was hoping to return to spring training with the Devil Rays in 2004, but he was suspended 30 days and fined for violating the drug policy put in place by MLB.

From 2004 until 2006, Hamilton did not play baseball at all. He made several attempts at rehab, and started off the 2005 season with hopes of being a star major league outfielder. His return to baseball was helped along by former minor league outfielder and manager Roy Silver, who owns a baseball academy in Florida. After hearing about Hamilton's desire to return to baseball, Silver offered the use of his facility if Hamilton agreed to work there. After several months there, Hamilton attempted to play with an independent minor league team, but MLB stepped in and disallowed it.

Left off the Rays' 40-man roster, Hamilton was selected in the 2006 Rule 5 Draft by the Chicago Cubs, who immediately traded him to the Cincinnati Reds for $100,000 ($50,000 for his rights, and $50,000 to cover the cost of the Rule 5 selection).

In order to retain the rights to Hamilton, the Reds had to keep him on their Major League 25-man roster for the entire 2007 season. He was one of the Reds' best hitters in spring training, leaving camp with a .403 batting average. The Reds planned to use him as a fourth outfielder.

Hamilton made his long-awaited Major League debut on April 2 against the Chicago Cubs in a pinch-hit appearance, receiving a 22-second standing ovation. After he lined out, Hamilton stayed in the game to play left field. As he was waiting to bat, Cubs catcher Michael Barrett said "You deserve it, Josh. Take it all in, brother. I'm happy for you." He made his first start on April 10 against the Arizona Diamondbacks, batting leadoff. Hamilton was named the National League Rookie of the Month for April.
On December 21, 2007, the Reds traded Hamilton to the Texas Rangers for Edinson Volquez and Danny Herrera.

Hamilton, usually slotted fourth in the Texas batting order, led all major league players in RBIs for the month of April. He was named American League (AL) Player of the Month after hitting .330 with 32 RBIs during the month. Hamilton then went on to win player of the month for the second straight month in May, becoming the first AL player in baseball history to be awarded Player of the Month for the first two months of the season. Hamilton was featured on the cover of the June 2, 2008 issue of Sports Illustrated, in a story chronicling his comeback. On July 9, 2008, Hamilton hit the first walk-off home run of his career, against Francisco Rodríguez.
Fans selected Hamilton as one of the starting outfielders for the AL at the MLB All Star Game at Yankee Stadium, where he would also participate in the home run derby. In the first round of the event Hamilton hit 28 home runs, breaking the single-round record of 24 set by Bobby Abreu in 2005. Hamilton ended up hitting the most total home runs in the contest with 35, but lost in the final round to Justin Morneau, as the scores were reset. His record-setting first round included 13 straight home runs at one point; three that went further than 500 feet. After the Derby, Hamilton said: "This was like living the dream out, because like I've said, I didn't know the ending to that dream."

Hamilton spent a portion of 2009 on the disabled list, with a bruised rib cage and an abdominal strain. After visiting doctors in Philadelphia on June 8, 2009, they found a slight abdominal tear, and he underwent a successful surgical operation to repair it the next day. Though injured, he was selected by fan voting to play in the 2009 All-Star game, where he was joined by teammates Michael Young and Nelson Cruz. Hamilton finished batting .268 with 10 home runs and 54 RBIs in 2009.

In 2010, Hamilton was moved to left field to put young outfielder Julio Borbon in center field. As in his prior two seasons with the Rangers, Hamilton was again selected to start in the 2010 All-Star Game, as one of six members of the Rangers to represent the franchise at the All-Star Game. Hamilton entered the All-Star Break with a .346 batting average.

Hamilton hit for a league-leading .359 average in 2010, winning his first batting title. His performance in 2010 earned him the AL MVP Award. His ALCS MVP performance propelled the Rangers to win the AL crown, giving the Rangers their first ever World Series appearance where they fell to the San Francisco Giants in five games.

Hamilton's struggles with drugs and alcohol are well documented. He finally got clean after being confronted by his grandmother. When giving a brief summary of his recovery, Hamilton says simply: "It's a God thing." He does not shy away from telling his story, speaking to community groups and fans at many functions. He frequently publicly tells stories of how Jesus brought him back from the brink and that faith is what keeps him going. His wife Katie sometimes accompanies him, offering her perspective on his struggles as well.

To comply with the provisions of MLB's drug policy, Hamilton provides urine samples for drug testing at least three times per week. Rangers' coach Johnny Narron says of the frequent testing: "I think he looks forward to the tests. He knows he's an addict. He knows he has to be accountable. He looks at those tests as a way to reassure people around him who had faith."

Hamilton confirmed he suffered a slip in early 2009. Sports blog Deadspin.com posted photos of Hamilton shirtless in a bar in Tempe, Arizona, with several women. According to reports, witnesses saw Hamilton drinking, heard him asking where he could obtain cocaine, and heard him reveal his plans to go to a strip club later that evening. The photos do not show Hamilton drinking or taking any illegal drugs.

Although this news did not break until August 2009, Hamilton revealed that he had informed his wife, the Texas Rangers, and Major League Baseball the day after the incident occurred.

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DISCLAIMER: PFP Sports Talent Agency does not claim to represent itself as the exclusive agent for Josh Hamilton. PFP Sports Talent Agency is a booking agency that represents organizations seeking to hire pro athletes and sports personalities such as Josh Hamilton for speaking engagements, personal appearances, product endorsements and corporate entertainment. Fees on this website are estimates and are intended only as a guideline. Exact fees are determined by a number of factors, including the location of event, the talent’s schedule, requested duties and supply and demand. PFP Sports Talent Agency makes no guarantees to the accuracy of information found on this website and does not warrant that any information or representations contained on this website will be accurate or free from errors. We are often asked how can I find out who is Josh Hamilton's agent? To find Josh Hamilton appearance fees and booking agent details, you can contact the agent, representative or manager through PFP Sports Talent Agency for speaking fee costs and availability. PFP Sports Talent Agency can help your company choose the ideal sports personality for your next marketing campaign. To hire Josh Hamilton for an appearance, speaking event or endorsement, contact Josh Hamilton's booking agent for more information.